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Cohabitation Bad For Kids!

A recent study by the Urban Institute, based on recent U.S. Census data, indicates cohabitation is bad for kids. For many teens, the study found, divorce is not the worst thing that can befall them. Having a boyfriend or a girlfriend move in with mom or dad is much worse. Emotional and behavioral problems, low school achievement, suspensions, and expulsions are several times higher among teens from cohabiting homes than even from single-parent families. Currently, 5 percent of American children live in cohabiting homes, and at the present rate of growth researchers predict at least 40 percent are likely to live in such arrangements by 2020. The evidence is indisputable: Traditional families, homes with married biological parents, remain the best environment for rearing children.

Family Research Council, June 28, 2001

 


 

Whose Bedroom, Whose Government?

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has advertised for a "Gay and Lesbian Program Specialist." The ad indicated that the employee would earn between $74,697 and $97,108 and would manage the Department's "Gay and Lesbian Employment Program." Why is it that the federal government should even set up such programs? Is it not a little ironic that advocates for the homosexual lifestyle have said for years that the government has "no business in the nation's bedrooms," but they seem incapable of keeping what goes on in their bedrooms out of the government.

Family Research Council Washington Update, June 27, 2001

 


 

Outlawing Christian Conversion

Sri Lanka's influential Buddhist clergy have called for laws to ban Christian conversions, which are spreading in poverty-stricken rural villages, and vowed collective action against the practice.

They have adopted an eleven-point plan to fight proselytizers, active in several districts of the island, and called on the authorities to immediately pass laws to prevent conversions they claim are taking place under the cover of helping rural communities to improve their economic standards.

They say a shortage of Buddhist monks in several temples is also allowing Christian priests to make inroads into the Buddhist heartland by converting farming communities. The monks say about 23,000 Buddhists are being converted to Christianity each year and proselytizers have targeted 5,000 out of the 25,400 villages in the country for their activities.

World News From Radio Australia, July 31, 2001

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September 2001 Edition
Volume 9, Issue 10
September 2001