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Abortion: The Depths of Its Curse

A recent study reveals what many have known for some time: abortion has a negative long-term psychological impact.

However, the study in the September issue of the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry also reports that these effects extend beyond the women who have an abortion. The findings indicate that women who have had abortions tend to provide their children less emotional support and their children tend to have more behavioral problems.

Richard Land, President of the SBC Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, observed, "This study did not focus on the immediate damage done to a woman and her unborn child. That is well substantiated. Yet there has been real suppression in the secular media over the clear and present link between abortion and the impact on the mental health of the woman and her family years after the abortion.

"Holding all other facts constant, women who had an abortion provided much less emotional support for the children they did have when compared to women who didn't have an abortion," Land said, noting the analysis conducted by Priscilla Coleman, a professor at Bowling Green State University, indicated additional emotional problems for their children in the five- to nine-year-old range.

"We know abortion leaves women emotionally and psychologically scarred, sometimes physically traumatized; now we know quantitatively the impact on their families," Land said on the September 21 broadcast of his weekly radio program, Richard Land Live! a caller-driven, mid-day talk program from noon to 3 p.m. Eastern time each Saturday over the Salem Radio Network.

Children whose mothers have a history of abortion tend to have less emotional support at home and more behavioral problems than children whose mothers have not had an abortion, Land said.

"The study further determined that mothers who have abortions are going to be not nearly as nurturing and supportive than those women who have never had an abortion," he continued.

"Abortion has killed nearly 44 million babies, an average of 4,000 babies a day, since it was legalized by the Supreme Court in 1973," Land said. "Now we learn for a fact that the children abortive women have later suffer the after-effects of their mother's abortion."

Land noted earlier studies cited in well-known medical journals confirmed that women who abort a child don't leave their so-called problem with the abortionist. He said rates of alcohol and drug abuse, psychiatric hospital admissions, sleep disorders, and suicide are significantly higher among women who had an abortion than the population at large.

This latest study on the effects of abortion on future children simply presents additional evidence, Land said, of the "horrific damage" that abortion is causing families.

"This is why we must be tireless in our efforts to save babies whose lives are in danger of being sacrificed on the altar of social convention, career advancement, or mere convenience," he continued.

Every county in America needs a women's pregnancy center to minister to women caught in a crisis pregnancy, Land said. "It is really analogous to the story of the Good Samaritan from the Bible. These women are out there, abandoned, like the thief left the man injured on the side of the road.

"It is Christians who must reach out to these women who are suffering in silence for this deed done years ago," Land said. "They need to know that Jesus is ready to forgive them."

Land said efforts such as the Psalm 139 Project minister to women in crisis pregnancies who are desperate to know there other people out there who will support them in their desire to give their baby life.

The Psalm 139 Project works to create an awareness of the value of ultrasound machines at woman's pregnancy centers and provides a way for people to give to a fund for the placement of the sonogram equipment in evangelistically oriented centers. For more information on this effort that directs 100 percent of donations to selected pregnancy centers, visit www.psalm139project.org or call toll-free 1-800-475-9127.

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January 2003 Edition
Volume 11, Issue 4
January 2003