SBC LIFE

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Multi-Ethnic Churches and Ministry

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The CAAC welcomed five new members, reviewed the group’s database dashboard, prayed for the presidential search committees of five SBC entities, and set 2019 goals and action plans during its August 2–3 meeting in Atlanta.

Members of the Executive Committee CAAC, joined by leaders of more than a dozen ethnic minority fellowships of Southern Baptist churches, presented a preliminary draft of The Many Faces of the Southern Baptist Convention.

The SBC Executive Committee has named a permanent advisory group to continue to equip, inform, and empower all Southern Baptists for the spread of the Gospel.

Two advisory councils submitted reports to Frank S. Page, president and CEO of the SBC Executive Committee, at the Many Faces booth in the exhibit hall on Monday, June 13, 2016.

The Multi-Ethnic Advisory Council received six reports and engaged in conversation about common ministry needs among the ethnic and racial groups represented by council members at its March 10–11 meeting in Atlanta.

The Council, representing numerous language, ethnic, and racial fellowships within the SBC, explored how their churches can more fully participate in Convention processes and reflected on ways the Convention can better serve the needs of their respective churches.

Leaders representing various language and ethnic groups told Frank S. Page, president of the SBC Executive Committee, they would like to be "incorporated" into the totality of Southern Baptist life, not merely "assimilated" as objects of ministry.

The church reaches a broad cross-section of tribal groups, with the assignment of carrying the Gospel to all the state’s reservations.

Arlington had changed dramatically, but Fielder Church was still white—and declining. The pastor knew the church had to change as well, if it was going to survive.

From its humble beginnings of three churches, the association, which may be Southern Baptists’ first affinity-based association, now includes seventy churches in ten North Carolina counties and two neighboring states.

By the time Ken Hall was called as pastor in 2003, Lilburn First Baptist had determined its God-given responsibility was to reach out to whomever God brought to their community to build a strong home base of ministry.

Representatives of the six SBC seminaries, a Baptist university, and the director of seminary extension recently met with representatives from African American, Asian, and Hispanic advisory councils in an educational summit to discuss course offerings designed to prepare individuals called to ministry from our many non-Anglo congregations.